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   HEALTH INFOMATION FOR PARENTS:

Welcome to the Medical Information section of our website. Posted in this section are for your information and reference. Most of these pertain to the services we offer for children, and some are on health precautions and advice for parents to ensure their children are safe during various situations, etc. If you have any queries or think your child/ children need a particular service, please write us a brief email with your query under “Contact Us”.

Index:

1. MR vaccination campaign launched. Rubella included for the fist time in national immunisation programme
2.
Oral Rehydration Solutions (ORS)
3. Breastfeed
4. Dengue Fever
5. Developmental Chart
6. Bhutani Nomogram
7. Developmental Observation Card(DOC)
8. New Born History & Examination
9. IAP Growth Charts
10. Vaccination
11. How to Feed Children

1. MR vaccination campaign launched. Rubella included for the fist time in national immunisation programme

.

A Measles and Rubella vaccination campaign (MR campaign), for immunisation of children, was formally launched by Minister for HRD Ganta Srinivasa Rao at the GVMC NMC High School at TPT Colony, Seethammadhara, on Tuesday.

Visakhapatnam North MLA P. Vishnu Kumar Raju, MLC PVN Madhav, District Medical and Health Officer R. Ramesh, District Education Officer Nagamani and District Immunisation Officer Jeevan Rani were among those who attended the programme.

Children of the school were vaccinated as part of the MR campaign, being organised in the district, from August 1 to 8. A single vaccine can prevent both the diseases.

Though vaccination of children against measles was being covered under the national immunisation programme, this was for the first time that rubella was introduced in the national immunisation programme.

Measles affects young children and is life threatening. The virus spreads from one person to another, when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

The symptoms of measles include: fever of 38.3 degree C or more, cough, running nose, diarrhoea and red watery eyes besides red blotchy rash all over the body.

Rubella virus not only affects children but grown up children up to the age of 15 years.

The symptoms include red blotchy rash, mild fever, headache and pinkish eyes.

DMHO Ramesh said parents having children in the age group of 9 months to 15 years should invariably get them vaccinated against measles and rubella.

This dose is in addition to the vaccination doses, which the children could already been administered earlier. If the child faces any problem, after administration of the vaccine, the parents should contact the centre, where the vaccine was administered or a government health centre for remedial action.

Dr. Ramesh said there were 10,76,956 children in the 9 months – 15 years age group.

The vaccine would be administered at 6,301 schools, 4,952 Anganwadi centres, 548 sub centres, 142 other centres and through 120 special teams in the district, the DMHO said.

2.  Oral Rehydration Solutions (ORS):

ors

3. BreastFeed:

Breast Feed

4. Dengue fever

Bhutani Nomogram

5. Development Chart

Development chart

6. Bhutani Nomogram:

Bhutani Nomogram

7. Development Observation Card:

DOC

8. New Born History and Examination:

New Born History

 9. IAP GrowtH CHARTs:

1.  IAP Boys BMI Chart 5-18 years  

IAP Boys Height & Weight chart 5-18 yearsIAP Boys BMI Chart 5-18 years Download(PDF)

2. IAP Boys Height & Weight chart 5-18 years

IAP Boys Height & Weight chart 5-18 yearsIAP Boys Height & Weight chart 5-18 years Download (PDF)

3. IAP Girls BMI Chart 5-18 years

IAP Girls BMI Chart 5-18 yearsIAP Girls BMI Chart 5-18 years Download (PDF)

4. IAP Girls Height & Weight chart 5-18 years

 IAP Girls Height & Weight chart 5-18 yearsIAP Girls Height & Weight chart 5-18 years Download PDF

5. WHO boys Height Weight Head Chart 0-5 years

WHO boys Height Weight Head Chart 0-5 yearsWHO boys Height Weight Head Chart 0-5 years Download PDF

6. WHO boys Weight for Height-Length Chart 

WHO boys Weight for Height-Length Chart WHO boys Weight for Height-Length Chart Download (PDF)

7. WHO Girls Height Weight Head Chart 0-5 years

WHO Girls Height Weight Head Chart 0-5 yearsWHO Girls Height Weight Head Chart 0-5 years Download (PDF)

8. WHO Girls Weight for Height-Length Chart

WHO Girls Weight for Height-Length ChartWHO Girls Weight for Height-Length Chart Download (PDF)

9. Boys 0-18 iap and who combined charts height and weight

Boys 0-18 iap and who combined charts height and weightBoys 0-18 iap and who combined charts height and weight Download (PDF)

10. Girls 0-18 iap and who combined charts height and weight

Girls 0-18 iap and who combined charts height and weightGirls 0-18 iap and who combined charts height and weight Download (PDF)

  10. Vaccination

+ Why does my baby need vaccination?

Your child needs vaccination as it provides a thorough defence (or immunity) against a potentially deadly disease.
Vaccination has proven to be the most effective method to stop the spread of infectious diseases like smallpox, polio etc.
Children are injected with certain vaccines as soon as their immune systems have developed sufficiently.
The rate of the development of the immune system leads to the formation of a vaccination or immunization chart.
Additional ‘booster’ shots are also required to achieve full immunity to a particular disease.

+ How do vaccines work?

Vaccines basically consist of either a  WEAKENED OR DEAD VERSION of the disease causing virus.
Yes, you are going to inject your child with a potentially deadly virus!!
But you needn’t worry…
Your baby’s immune system is fully capable of recognizing and dealing with these threats.
And once your baby’s immune system has dealt with the virus, it keeps a record of it in the immune system.
Your child is now capable of identifying & dealing with similar threats in the future.

+ Immunization Schedule

No.

Age of the Child

Name of the Vacccine

1

Birth

BCG, OPV, Hepatitis B (1st)

2

6 Weeks

DTP/ DTaP +HiB + OPV/ IPV
Pneumonococcal Vaccine (1st)
Hepatitis B (2nd)
Rotavirus (1st)

3

10 Weeks

DTP/ DTaP +HiB + OPV/ IPV
Pneumonococcal Vaccine (2nd)
Rotavirus (2nd)

4

14 Weeks

DTP/ DTaP +HiB + OPV/ IPV
Pneumonococcal Vaccine (3rd)
Rotavirus (3rd)

5

6 Months

Hepatitis B (3rd), OPV
First Dental Check Up *

6

9 Months

Measles Vaccine, OPV

7

12 Months

Pneumonococcal (4th Dose)
Hepatitis A (1st)

8

15 Months

MMR (1st) 
Chicken Pox (1st)

9

18 Months

DTP/ DTaP + OPV/ IPV + HiB
(1st Booster)
Hepatitis A (2nd)

10

2 Years

Typhoid Vaccine

11

3 Years

MMR (2nd) ***
Chicken Pox (2nd) ***

12

5 Years

DTP/ DTaP,  OPV/ IPV
(2nd Booster)
Typhoid Vaccine

13

8 Years

Typhoid Vaccine

14

10 Years

Tdap / dT / TT

15

12 Years

Typhoid

16

13-26 Years (Only for girl child)

HPV 1st Dose
HPV 2nd Dose (2 months from 1st Dose)
HPV 3rd Dose (6 months from 1st Dose)

17

Anytime after 6 months of age

Influenza (Flu) Vaccine **

   11. How to Feed Children:

Birth to 3 Months: Feeding Your Newborn

Help your newborn be calm and stay awake

Your newborn comes out of a quiet, dark place into a world full of sights, sounds and commotion. To do well with eating, she needs help being calm and staying awake. To help her, feed her the way she wants you to.

Do what your baby wants with feeding

Don't worry about spoiling her. You can't spoil a tiny baby.

Your baby knows how much to eat

Your baby will eat as much as she needs and grow in the way that is right for her if you maintain a division of responsibility in feeding.You are responsible for the what of feeding - breastmilk or formula. Your baby is responsible for everything else - when, where, how much, how fast.

2 to 6 Months: Feeding Your Infant

When your baby is 2 or 3 months old, he begins to learn about love. He watches, smiles, jabbers, and reaches out to get your attention and to keep you close. Go by information coming from your baby to guide feeding. That shows him you love him and teaches him to love you back. Don't worry about spoiling him. You can't spoil a tiny baby. Continue to feed on demand. Wait until he is near six months to start solids, then start based on what your baby can do, not on how old he is.

Your baby will eat and grow in the way that is right for him if you maintain a division of responsibility in feeding. You are responsible for the what of feeding - breastmilk or formula. Your baby is responsible for everything else - whenwherehow muchhow fast.

5 to 9 Months: Feeding Your Older Baby

Your older baby's learning to eat solid foods goes along with her interest in the world. She watches you eat, and she wants to eat, too. Go by what your baby can do, not by how old she is to guide starting and progressing solid foods.  Then let her do it her way. One baby will accept solid foods from the start, quickly learn to close her lips over the spoon and swallow, accept thicker, lumpier food, and be ready by 7 to 10 months to finger-feed herself modified family food at family meals. Another cautiously accepts solids but needs to be introduced gradually to a variety of tastes and textures and get to family meals when she is in her second or even third year. Another takes to the spoon demands to feed herself—even  though she can't! Still another isn't at all interested in the spoon, and waits to eat solid foods until she can finger-feed herself family food.  

Have the right goals

This point is NOT to get food into your baby. She is getting plenty of nourishment from her breastmilk or formula. It is to introduce her to the notion of eating different food, in a different way. Stow your agenda, and don’t get pushy or you will spoil the fun for both of you!

Look for the signs. Your baby is ready to be introduced to solid foods when she can:

How to introduce solid foods (provided your child is willing):

Help your baby develop mouth skills

You will help your baby to develop her mouth skills by offering her thicker and lumpier food and then pieces of soft family food at family meals. She will eat more regularly and at longer intervals, so feeding times are partly on demand and partly on a schedule that you determine. Feeding her will go best if you get started now with family meals.

 

7 to 15 Months: Feeding Your Almost-toddler

The almost-toddler – the child just getting started with finger-feeding – cares deeply about feeding himself and is enthusiastic about eating almost everything you put before him. The problem is the suddenness of his transition from being spoon-fed. One day he happily lets you feed him. The very next day – or the very next meal – he refuses to eat from the spoon, grabs at it, and puts up a fuss when you try to feed him. Many parents become alarmed and force or play games to get their child to eat. Don’t. His eating will be worse, not better, and you will introduce feeding struggles that can go on for years. Instead, let him feed himself. Get started with family meals, if you aren't having them already, and eat with him, don't just feed him.

To address sudden meal refusal

  • Offer your child safe food to pick up, chew and swallow: soft or easily chewed table food. Be considerate without catering with meal-planning. 

  • Let him eat his way-fingers or spoon, much or little, fast or slowly, and in any order - even if he eats dessert first.

  • Offer breastmilk or formula in a cup, not a bottle. He may have whole milk when he is eating family food at mealtime and is a year or more old. 

  • Give him about a tablespoon of each food. Let him eat or not. Let him have more if he wants.

  • Give him lots of chances to try new food and learn to like it.

Get started with sit-down snacks

Offer your child sit-down snacks every two or three hours between meals so he can arrive at mealtime hungry (but not starved) and ready to eat the food there. Offer any nipple-fed breastmilk or formula as a structured, sit-down snack. Don't offer anything else between times except water. You are establishing the meals-plus-snacks routine of the division of responsibility for older children: Parents do the whatwhen and where of feeding, children do the how much and whether of eating.

3 to 8 Years: Feeding Your Preschooler/Early School Age Child

Your child stops being a preschooler when he stops struggling continually for control, becomes more cooperative, and shows signs of wanting to please you. Along with everything else, feeding becomes easier. The preschooler/early school age child wants to please you and wants to get better at all that he does - including eating. But in some ways, that makes feeding harder. You can get a child in this developmental stage to eat more, less, or different foods than he wants. You can keep after him about table manners, even though it is still natural for him to use his fingers along with his silverware. But if you do, it will make him feel bad about eating. He will lose his pleasure in learning to eat the foods you eat. He will lose his ability to eat as much as he is hungry for and stop when he is full. He will, that is, provided he is a compliant child. If he is not so compliant, he will fight back and feeding will become a battle ground. Stow your agendas, make meals with food you enjoy, eat with him, and follow the division of responsibility in feeding.  Then trust your preschooler to manage his own eating

  • Have 3 meals a day at set times and sit-down snacks at more-or-less set times. Say no to between-times food and beverage grazing - except for water.

  • Sit down and eat with him, don't just feed him. Be good company.

  • Be family-friendly in your rmeal and snack planning, not by catering to your child, but by including some foods that everyone can eat and enjoy. putting together meals that allow everyone to be successful.

  • Let him serve himself and eat his way - fast or slow, much or little1 or 2 foods. Let him eat in any order, even if he eats dessert first.

  • Let him have more of any food (except dessert), even if he hasn't cleaned his plate.Excuse him when he is done.

9 to 12 Years: Feeding Your Late School-age Child9 to 12 Years: Feeding Your Late School-age Child9 to 12 Years: Feeding Your Late School-age Child

Your school-age child is full of contradictions. She wants to master all things - including eating, but she is still a child, and is entitled to be free from worry about eating, moving, and weight. She seems independent, but she continues to need the structure and support of regular family meals and structured snacks. If she has good food acceptance skills, she can contribute ideas to family meal planning. That is, she comes to meals readily, is polite and pleasant there, picks and chooses from the food that is available, says yes please and no thank you and leaves without making a fuss. 

 

If you do your jobs with feeding, your child will do hers with eating.

  • Arrange for your child to have 3 family-friendly meals a day at set times.

  • Let her eat her way-fast or slowly, much or littlesome of everything or 1 or 2 foods.

  • Let her eat in any order, even if she eats dessert first.

  • Let her have more of any food, even if she hasn't cleaned her plate.

  • Say no to between-times food and beverage grazing-except for water.

Exert your authority on after-school snacking. 

  • Make rules, then expect her to go by the rules. The rules are about structure. 

  • Snack right after school and at the table. No munching along with homework or in front of the TV.

  • Teach her simple snack-planning: include 2 or 3 foods;.choose foods that give protein, fat and carbohydrate 

  • After she learns to go by the snacking ruls, let her choose her own snack, even if it is high in fat or high in sugar.

12 to 17 Years: Feeding Your Adolescent

The Division of Responsibility in Feeding and Division of Resposibility in Activity still apply to your adolescent. Despite his acting like it doesn't matter, your adolescent continues to depend on you to maintain the structure of family meals. He will participate in family meals when you make meals a priority, keep mealtimes pleasant, and be considerate without catering with meal-planning. Adolescents who have family meals do better in all ways, and they do better nutritionally after they leave home. With feeding as with all other things, your task is to find the middle ground between being controlling on the one hand and throwing away all controls on the other.

Continue to follow the division of responsibility in feeding

It guides you in knowing when to take leadership and when to let go.

Exert your authority on after-school snacking. 

Call: 0877 2229626

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